Fast Facts: Black-Spot Goatfish

Also known by other names, such as Blacksaddle Goatfish A species of Goatfish and an inhabitant of coral reefs, it can be found at depths from 10 to 80 meters. This species can reach a length of 50 centimetres. They have two barbels extending from the chin, which are used to probe the sand forContinue reading “Fast Facts: Black-Spot Goatfish”

Fast Facts: Pineapplefish

The Pineapplefish is an unusual fish that can produce light from organs on the lower jaw. The Pineapplefish looks like a pineapple, hence the name. On either side of the lower jaw is a light organ that produces a greenish glow. The colour of the light is reported to change to red as the fishContinue reading “Fast Facts: Pineapplefish”

Fast Facts: Grey Nurse Sharks

The Grey Nurse Shark is listed as two separate populations within Australia. The east coast population is listed as critically endangered. The west coast population is listed as vulnerable. This species became the first protected shark in the world when the New South Wales Government declared it a protected species in 1984. The Grey Nurse Shark isContinue reading “Fast Facts: Grey Nurse Sharks”

Short Story: Grey Nurse Sharks

My biceps bulged, as I lifted my bright white, heavy scuba tank, caressing it like a baby, to the floor of my humble, zippy car. The aroma of bacon and eggs hypnotised me, as I took my last bite of the salty, creamy, crisp and runny protein-packed morsel. My tongue contracted, as I flooded myContinue reading “Short Story: Grey Nurse Sharks”

Sea Doctor: Treating Bluebottle Stings

Bluebottles inhabit waters throughout Australia and are often found in swarms. The sting causes immediate pain, usually lasting about 30 minutes, with typical oval-shaped blanched wheals and surrounding redness of the skin. To treat a sting: 1- Pick off any adherent tentacles with fingers (this has been shown not to be harmful to the rescuer).Continue reading “Sea Doctor: Treating Bluebottle Stings”

Fast Facts: Blue Bottles

The bluebottle (Physalia utriculus) is sometimes confused with its larger, more venomous Atlantic cousin, the Portuguese Man o’ War. It is a common summer visitor to Sydney beaches. In Sydney, it is the north eastern winds and warmer currents, that bring them to beaches on the incoming tides. The Bluebottle is really a colony of fourContinue reading “Fast Facts: Blue Bottles”